The Art of Fleaing

Let there be an opening into the quiet
theparisreview:

Marianne Moore’s strange, sad childhood: “Mary [her mother] established a pattern whereby Marianne, in family conversations and correspondence, was invariably referred to as a boy and identified only with male pronouns. Furthermore, Mary encouraged the siblings to regard each other as ‘lovers,’ and to think of her as their ‘lover,’ too.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Marianne Moore’s strange, sad childhood: “Mary [her mother] established a pattern whereby Marianne, in family conversations and correspondence, was invariably referred to as a boy and identified only with male pronouns. Furthermore, Mary encouraged the siblings to regard each other as ‘lovers,’ and to think of her as their ‘lover,’ too.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

I’m not the girl your mother warns you about.
I won’t kiss your best friend or break your heart.
I won’t make you choose between what you love to do & me.
I’m not cold. I’m not reckless.

I’m the girl your father mentions when your mom’s not around.
I’m the girl that gets away.

I will love you more than anything.
I will kiss you when you cry.
I will stand by your side until you decide otherwise.

And you’re just like your father, so you will.

You’ll let me go & I won’t look back,
But you will.
I promise you, you will.

I’m that girl.

(Source: caramelcoatedxxxtacy, via madiface)

"Her and Lost In Translation are connected to each other. They’re very much on the same wavelength. They explore a lot of the same ideas. This all makes sense since Spike Jonze and Sofia Coppola were married from 1999 to 2003 and had been together for many years before that. Sofia Coppola had already made her big personal statement in regards to love and marriage right when the couple was on the verge of divorce; Her would be Spike Jonze’s answer to those feelings. What makes it even more poignant is that Her never feels resentful or petty. It feels more like a legitimate apology. It’s an acknowledgement that, in the end, some people aren’t meant to be with each other in the long run. Some people do grow apart. Lost in Translation is about a couple on the verge of growing apart, Her is about finally letting go of the person you’ve grown apart with and moving on.”

(Source: scanis, via saintofsass)

And I would always text back, ‘BTB’ - bring that booty.

—Darryl Philbin, The Office

(Source: thedapperproject)

artmastered:

Nicolas Poussin, Et in Arcadia ego, 1637-38, oil on canvas, 121 x 185 cm, Musée du Louvre, Paris
A group of shepherds dressed in classical attire surround a large stone tomb. Two of these figures point to a memorial inscription on the front of the tomb: Et in Arcadia ego. This roughly translates as ‘Even in Arcadia, I am’, which is read as a reference to death’s ever-existing presence, even in paradise.

"Et in Arcadia ego" is future tattoo. So. Excite.

artmastered:

Nicolas Poussin, Et in Arcadia ego, 1637-38, oil on canvas, 121 x 185 cm, Musée du Louvre, Paris

A group of shepherds dressed in classical attire surround a large stone tomb. Two of these figures point to a memorial inscription on the front of the tomb: Et in Arcadia ego. This roughly translates as ‘Even in Arcadia, I am’, which is read as a reference to death’s ever-existing presence, even in paradise.

"Et in Arcadia ego" is future tattoo. So. Excite.

I no longer have the energy for meaningless friendships, forced interactions or unnecessary conversations. If we don’t vibrate on the same frequency there’s just no reason for us to waste our time. I’d rather have no one and wait for substance than to not feel someone and fake the funk.

—Joquesse Eugenia

(Source: wnderlst, via thedapperproject)

Emotions, in my experience, aren’t covered by single words. I don’t believe in “sadness,” “joy,” or “regret.” Maybe the best proof that language is patriarchal is that it oversimplifies feeling. I’d like to have at my disposal complicated hybrid emotions, Germanic traincar constructions like, say, “the happiness that attends disaster” or “the disappointment of sleeping with one’s fantasy.”

Middlesex, Jeffery Eugenides

It’s about misunderstandings between people and places, being disconnected and looking for moments of connection. There are so many moments in life when people don’t say what they mean, when they are just missing each other, waiting to run into each other in a hallway.

—Sofia Coppola on Lost in Translation (2003)

(Source: larmoyante, via thedapperproject)

Current problem: I am not reading enough Rumi.